Create A Sun

 

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How To Create A Sun:

Quick note. If you dont want to worry about the math aspects of the Sun, just post in the forum about the size or class you'd like the sun to be, and I can do it for you in like 2 seconds.

Name of Sun:
Solar System:1st or 2nd Star in System / Binary Star system or not: Tatooine for example has a binary star system.
Orbiting Phenomena: Space stations, planets, Asteroid belts, etc.
Sequence Stage: Pre-Main Sequence, Post-Main Sequence, Main Sequence, Compact Stars

**Out of the OBAFGKM system, OBA are considered to have too short of life spans to harbor native species. Those will be better suited for Immigrated Species, strongholds, barren solar systems, and more. Conversely, M stars are not the most optimal for native worlds as the planet would have to be so close that it would have disastrous weather. Large F stars are not the most optimal either as they'll be giving off too much heat and would mostly boil an atmosphere away. Binary Star systems would cause the orbit of their planets to be largely skewed and hard to predict.

OBAFGKM

O 16x
B 12x
A 8x
F 4x
G 1x
K .5x
M .01x

Anything that falls above this criteria is considered a Supermassive Star; 9x=/+ = Supermassive Star

G stars are more or less equal to the sun in our solar system and should be used as the model star when making calculations. G stars are at a figure of 1x AU, where O stars are 16x AU, and M stars are .01x AU.

((AU = About 150 million KM))

Stars have the following data:
Size: (For G stars, Mass = .6-1.4 AU) [.9 AU]
Luminosity:  M to the 4th power. [.66 AU Brightness]
Diameter: M to the .74th power. [.93 AU Diameter]
Surface Temperature: M to the .505th power. [.95 AU Temp]
Lifetime: M to the -2.5th power [1.3 Billion Years]
Habitable Zone: Root of Lumosity. 95% of this number and 137% of this number for closest a habitable planet can be to furthest. [.81 AU AVG, 95%=.77 AU // 137%=1.11 AU]

When drawing out the map, this will help to ensure the sun is proportionate in size as well as ensure hot planets are where hot planets need to be and cold planets are where cold planets are supposed to be.

On top of that, every sun has a safe distance of Inner and Outer boundaries that allow a planet to maintain an orbit without spiraling into the sun or leaving the suns grasp. For inner, the equation is; 0.1 X Mass [.09 AU].

For Outer, the equation is; 40 X Mass [36 AU].

The Frost Line is where ice forms prior to the loss of gravitational pull from the sun but after the habitable zone of the sun. The equation is, 4.85/L (Luminosity) [3.94 AU].

Gas Giants typically form about 1 to 1.2 AU further than the Frost Line. Adjacent orbital patterns of planets tends to be between 1.4 and 2.0 AU.

To get planets further than the (first) Gas Giant multiply it's distance by a number between 1.4 and 2.0 AU, to get planets closer, divide by a number between 1.4 and 2.0 AU. The orbits of the planets mapped put cannot be closer than .15 AU from each other, otherwise the planets will have irregular orbits that will be the cause of their demise.

Type / Class:
There are seven types of main sequence stars in the galaxy;
“O” stars were blue and hot, and had a lifespan of less than one million years. There were approximately one hundred million habitable O stars in the galaxy.
“B” stars were white-blue and hot, and had a lifespan of ten million years. There were approximately one hundred million habitable B stars in the galaxy.
“A” stars were white and hot, and had a lifespan of four hundred million to two billion years. There were approximately one hundred million habitable A stars in the galaxy.
“F” stars were yellow-white and medium-temperature, and had a lifespan of four billion years. There were approximately one hundred million habitable F stars in the galaxy.
“G” stars were yellow and medium-temperature, and had a lifespan of ten billion years. There were approximately two billion habitable G stars in the galaxy.
“K” stars were orange and cool, and had a lifespan of sixty billion years. There were approximately 3.75 billion habitable K stars in the galaxy.
“M” stars were red and cool, and had a lifespan of approximately one hundred trillion years. They were also called red dwarfs. There were approximately seven hundred million habitable M stars in the galaxy.

With O stars being the biggest in the sequence, the size decreased exponentially to the smallest M stars.

There are two types Pre-Main Sequence Stars;

Brown Dwarf A brown dwarf was a star whose mass was too small to maintain hydrogen fusion reactions. Brown dwarfs were sometimes considered large gas giants.
Protostar A protostar, also known as a proto-star, was an object that was formed by the slow collapse of a nebula that would eventually form a new star.


There are three types of Post-Main Sequence stars;

Red Giant A red giant was a star that had progressed past the main sequence. It was smaller than a red supergiant.
Blue Giant A blue giant was a massive star that had progressed past the main sequence. It is larger than the Red Giant, but smaller than the Red Supergiant.
Red Supergiant A red supergiant was a supergiant star that had progressed past the main sequence. It was larger than a red giant.

There are four types of Compact Stars;

White Dwarf A white dwarf was a small star formed at the end of a small to medium mass star’s evolution. These stars could no longer sustain nuclear fusion of hydrogen, and only gave off faint light from their residual heat.
Black Dwarf A black dwarf was a rare compact star and one endpoint of stellar evolution. White dwarf stars that were once giant stars decayed into black dwarfs after burning all of their fuel and then cooling.
Neutron Star A neutron star was the stellar material that was left over from a supernova. Neutron stars had extremely strong gravity and could douse their star systems in lethal radiation. A rapidly rotating neutron star was known as a pulsar. The chemical element illerium was usually found in neutron stars.
Black Hole A black hole was an astrophysical phenomenon with gravity of sufficient strength that it prevented even light from escaping. Black holes typically resulted from the supernova of extremely large stars (typically supergiants), which resulted in matter so heavy that they could push into the fabric of space, though some were thought to have been created in the initial moments of the formation of the universe.

Level of Activity: 1-5.
1 would be considered extremely less than normal activity, lack of Solar flares or even sunspots. Very dormant in nature. 3 would be nominal, normal functions and activity like our sun in life. Common sunspots, short lived solar flares, etc. 5 would be considered extremely dangerous with high activity. Solar flares that knock out technology temporarily or even permanently. Sunspots that covered vast amounts of surface that might cause problems for a planet in the system.

Create A Sun

--Title-- Sci Fi Galaxy jackjallo